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Archive for July, 2009

Hiyaa, I’m back

Posted by Hari Saryono on 30 July 2009

Sorry to abandon this website for so long. After for months distracting with another job, I decide to reactivated this website. I know, that i’ve lost many things here, but I hope this site will recover soon.

As usual, this blog still concentrating in virus, antivirus and manual virus removal, while virus tool and software is an added value. Of course you need a good tool in removing virus.

As lately, it’s look like virus problem is not any concern anymore, I’ll fill this blog with another related problem.

Welcome and thanks for your patience in following this blog alive again

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Michael Jackson : Dr. Conrad Murray Gave Him Propofol

Posted by absnet on 28 July 2009

We’ve told you since July 15 police believe Dr. Conrad Murray administered Propofol to Michael Jackson — the drug that killed him. There’s a reason police believe it. Dr. Murray told them.

Two days after Jackson’s death, Dr. Murray told LAPD detectives he administered Propofol to the singer hours before he died … this, according to multiple law enforcement sources.

We’re told Dr. Murray gave Jackson an IV drip of the powerful anesthesia. Police believe Dr. Murray simply wasn’t paying attention when the singer’s heart stopped beating.

0724_conrad_jackson4_ex

Authorities believe Dr. Murray may have actually fallen asleep during the time the drug was administered and may have awakened to find Jackson already dead from heart failure.

An IV drip of Propofol allows a constant, steady infusion of the drug for a period of time determined by the person administering it.

It is considered reckless in the medical community for a doctor to administer an IV drip of Propofol without the patient being monitored by an EKG, which sounds an alarm when the patient’s pulse drops too low. No EKG was found in the house.
Another device — known as a pulse oximeter — is used to determine the oxygen saturation in the patient’s blood. If the patient’s breathing slows to a dangerous level, an alarm alerts the treating physician. Again, no oximeter was found in the house (TMZ)

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